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Quite frankly, the reaction that Rubenhold has received from some quarters because of her book because just shows how misogynist and sexist people are. The mystery author deserved the criticism for her book was an example of how not to research.

Five Women

Rubenhold basically puts the women in historical context. There is an important difference, however, Rubenhold is more conservative in her conclusions than Greer. Greer relied on guesswork and deduction in some places her most far reaching was having Anne be partially responsible for the first printing of the Works. When she supposes, it is a minor way and the supposition is clear.

Those are the victims. And Rubenhold is correct. The murderer is remembered, dare we say celebrated, more than his victims. How many of us can name a victim of Charles Manson outside of Tate?

The Five: The Untold Lives of the Women Killed by Jack the Ripper by Hallie Rubenhold

Perhaps, in remembering the name of the murderer as opposed to the murdered not only is it one name to remember in many cases, but the actor is the reason. This in addition to the status of the victims as well. Rubenhold traces the lives of the women as much as she is able to.

The London and because of Stride, the Sweden, she presents is familiar to any reader of say Charles Dickens, Arnold, Judith Flanders, or social history. If you have any detailed societal history, the facts are not surprising or shocking. Or quite frankly, something you should be debating. What Rubenhold does is takes those societal facts and the known facts about the victims and presents the victims as people.

Some of the women were mothers.

Group of five women facing charges for organized retail crime at Northlake Mall

Most of the women had people who loved them. Who were mourned. All were products of a cultural that did not value women in the same way it valued men. Something that Rubenhold points out, and notes its long shadow. We judge victims on worthiness. Take for instance, the Grim Sleeper case in California. If those victims had more money, had been white, would the case have gone unnoticed for so long? Rubenhold also addresses how prostitution was defined and how women of different ages coped with being on the street. Think about it — today, do we think every homeless woman is a prostitute?

So why should we think the same about women back then. It shows the effect of poverty and limited options. And this is something that still affects and effects today. More importantly, Rubenhold presents all this — social history, brief biographies - in a format that is easily approachable and readable. You just have to know how to read. Two other points — sources are footnoted and documented.


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She is nothing like David Irving. The most touching part of the book is the appendix where the belongings of the women are listed. The fact that I listened to this on audiobook in just six days says it all. Mileage may vary on the dramatic evocation of emotions, but the archival research and the cultural and social scene-setting is extraordinarily well done.

Do read it, whe The fact that I listened to this on audiobook in just six days says it all. Do read it, whether you enjoy True Crime or not. Pretty amazing piece of research. How the author discovered so much detail about women who would be completely forgotten were they not victims of a horrific murderer is impressive. How t Pretty amazing piece of research. How they ended up that way is quite heartbreaking.

And why did it take so long for someone to tell their story, especially considering the immense fame of their killer?

My hat is off to Hallie for writing this. I was looking forward to reading this book and whilst there was much to like about it I felt that there was too many assumptions made. Here are three examples: 'it is likely that a 22 year-old servant called Annie Chapman was among them'. These examples occurred in two paragraphs on p I was looking forward to reading this book and whilst there was much to like about it I felt that there was too many assumptions made.

These examples occurred in two paragraphs on page There are numerous other examples littered throughout the book. There are many irrelevances in the narrative which seem to me to be there to pad out the book, otherwise it would only run to pages or so. Another minor quibble is that there are very few page breaks and the reader is confronted with page after page of block text.

May 08, K. Trigger warnings: murder, misogyny, alcohol abuse, mentions of domestic violence, mentions of sex slavery, 19th century attitudes to mental health, death of a child.

I've been excited about this book from the moment I heard about it, and it didn't disappoint. Rubenhold has done a staggering amount of research on these five women, and the book is equal parts their stories and the social history of women in the s.

The Nobel Prize in Chemistry

They were victims of circumstance as much as they were victims of the Ripper. Ru Trigger warnings: murder, misogyny, alcohol abuse, mentions of domestic violence, mentions of sex slavery, 19th century attitudes to mental health, death of a child. Rubenhold restores humanity to the five victims that has long been denied them, and she largely skips over their deaths, choosing instead to focus on their lives and what happened after they were discovered.

It reminds us that the victims of serial killers were human beings. That these women were daughters, sisters, lovers, wives, mothers. That their lives were controlled by men, whether it be their fathers, employers, husbands, judges or the men at the workhouses they were so frequently forced to turn to.

This book was compelling as hell from start to finish and I would highly recommend it. Mar 16, Ian rated it liked it Shelves: whitechapel. I think it's commendable to focus on the lives of victims and the circumstance of the time. However the author seems, like a victorian snob, obsessed about elevating social status of the victims. For example she speculates that Mary Kelly was from a higher class.

This seems to be solely based on a comment that she was, 'an artist of some measure'. On this basis the author jumps to conclusion that she had artistic training, and was therefore posh, without any particular evidence. What else could ex I think it's commendable to focus on the lives of victims and the circumstance of the time. What else could explain this? For a start, what one person considers artistic ability may not be of any formal standard.

Also surprisingly sometimes even working people can draw. She also concocts a story that Kelly was taken to France against her will, again without any evidence.